Biting Off More Than I Can Chew?

I thrive on variety. I do my best work when I have multiple projects on the go and can switch between them at will. If I get bored with or stuck on one thing, my brain will likely come up with ideas on how to progress with something else. This helps me to keep working on projects regularly and stops me getting blocked from writing for long periods.

 

But there is perhaps a limit to how much I can work on at the same time. A range of stuff is good. So, it generally works if I have a novel, a short story, a fanfic and an article on my to-do list at any given time. That way, I can gain satisfaction from a quick win or delve into a much larger project. It also generally means the various projects are at different stages, so I’ll have plenty of choice depending on whether I want to brainstorm, bang words out onto the page or revise.

 

At the moment, my list is pretty stuffed.

 

My first-choice publisher has asked for some revisions to my first novel before they make a final decision about whether they want to accept it. Which is awesome, but which is also going to take a fair bit of work. There’s no deadline, but I want to get it back to them by the end of June, or before, if I can.

 

I’m reviewing at The Vaults 2019 for Fringe Guru, which involves one or two shows per week until mid-March, with short deadlines for the reviews. I’m loving doing this, but it’s taking a significant chunk of my writing time each week, and also taking up an evening a week for actually going to the shows.

 

I’m writing discussion posts for GYWO again this year, which is a monthly commitment and also something I really enjoy.

 

I have my usual rolling spreadsheet of submission opportunities, which has me working on two short stories for deadlines at the end of February. And I’ve just started a ten-week online writing course, which is going to involve developing several ideas for short pieces.

 

I’ve got back into short fanfiction challenges this year, which are great fun but require several new ideas per week, and also often involve reading and commenting on other people’s entries.

 

I’m still quite keen to work on my idea for a non-fiction book, though starting the research on that has been delayed as I’ve been too busy with other stuff.

 

And, this morning, I applied to take part in this year’s Six Month Novel Programme, with a view to getting a first draft of my second novel done by the end of the year. This may have been a mistake. I mean, getting a draft done is one of my main goals for 2019 and I could really use the structure and external encouragement/deadlines of the programme. But it’s also a big commitment and really intensive.

 

I have a plan as to how to fit both novels into my schedule, and I’m currently writing every day, which is unusual for me and going really well so far. I also have a lot of writing sessions booked into my calendar and I’m doing a lot better at writing at home as well.

 

But I suspect several things are going to have to fall by the wayside as the year goes on. I’m pretty sure I can’t keep up my current output on everything, especially if I get onto the Six Month Novel Programme. I think it will be good for me, though, and certainly help me towards what is probably my hardest goal for the year. If the amazing happens and I get a book deal in a few months, I really want to have something else ready to send to the publisher while the first novel is in production. And, if the first one doesn’t work out, it’ll be even more important to have something else in the works.

 

So, I’m going for it, and I’ll just have to be aware of the possibility of burn-out. It’ll be sad to give up on the fun/silly/small stuff and I’ll do my best to at least keep my hand in, so I don’t get overwhelmed by the bigger projects. But I’ve got to keep my eye on where I really want to go with my writing and make sure I dedicate enough time and energy to the important stuff. I’ll just have to see how it goes and adjust accordingly.

 

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